Deadline extended for RTDNA/NEFE Awards entries

July 13, 2017 11:00

The deadline has been extended for the NEFE/RTDNA Awards entry period until Friday, July 28. If you think your financial reporting stacks up among the best, send it to us and you'll have a chance at a cash prize and a free trip to present your work to attendees at the nation’s premier journalism conference. The contest is open to all media: Three winners will be chosen from radio, online and television.

Television stations take note: If your station uses a "working for you" or "on your side" kind of brand and produces consumer-related news every day, this contest is a great place to highlight the work your station is doing. Look through your archives of the past year for stories that focused on personal finance issues and submit your best work. Chris Vanderveen from Denver was our television winner last year:
 

Winners will receive a $1,000 prize, complimentary registration to Excellence in Journalism 2017 in Anaheim, California, along with round-trip airfare and two nights hotel.
 
Winners will co-present a special “Money Matters session at the conference, breaking down their award-winning submissions and sharing key reporting tools and best practices they used to add depth to their reporting. Audience members will walk away from the session with several ways to creatively approach their reporting and make comprehensive topics more digestible to viewers and listeners.

Submit your entries by Friday, July 28, 2017 at 11:59PM PT! Registration is $25 for RTDNA members and $50 for non-members.
 
Want to enter? Click here, or visit our contest website for entry requirements and more information.

If you have questions about the contest, please contact Kate McGarrity at katem@rtdna.org

The Radio Television Digital News Association and the National Endowment for Financial Education honor the very best in personal finance reporting. The awards are presented as part of the Money Matters resource on the RTDNA website. Money Matters is a tool to help journalists better cover stories about financial issues on television, radio and online.