Cameras in the Court Guide (Alabama-Idaho)

The information below was updated in the summer of 2012.


Alabama

Allows Cameras? No
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? Yes
Audio or Video Webcast? No
Media Guide Available? No



Trial and appellate courtroom coverage is permissible if the Supreme Court of Alabama has approved a plan for the courtroom in which coverage will occur. The plan must contain certain safeguards to assure that coverage will not detract from or degrade court proceedings, or otherwise interfere with a fair trial. If such a plan has been approved, a trial judge may, in the exercise of “sound discretion” permit coverage if: (1) in a criminal proceeding, all accused persons and the prosecutor give their written consent and (2) in a civil proceeding, all litigants and their attorneys give their written consent. Following approval of their coverage plans, appellate courts may authorize coverage if the parties and their attorneys give their written consents. In both trial and appellate contexts, the court must halt coverage during any time that a witness, party, juror, or attorney expressly objects. In an appellate setting, it must also halt coverage during any time that a judge expressly objects to coverage.


Authority: Canon 3A(7), 3A(7A), and 3A(7B), Alabama Canons of Judicial Ethics, Ala. Code, Vol. 23A (Rules of Alabama Supreme Court).

Alaska

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? No
Media Guide Available? No

The news media, which includes the electronic media, still photographers and sketch artists, may cover court proceedings in all state trial and appellate courts. Administrative Rule 50 permits media coverage anywhere in the state court facility and is not limited to courtrooms, but to cover a proceeding the media must apply for and receive the consent of the presiding judge. Requests for coverage must be made 24 hours prior to the proceeding, and applications that are timely filed are deemed to have been approved, unless otherwise prohibited. The consent of all parties is required for coverage of divorce, dissolution of marriage, domestic violence, child custody and visitation, paternity or other family proceedings.

Jurors may not be photographed, filed or videotaped in the courtroom at any time. Victims of a sexual offense may not be photographed, filmed, videotaped or sketched without the consent of the court and the victim. A procedure is prescribed for suspension of an individual’s or an organization’s media coverage privileges for a period of up to one year for violation of the media coverage plan.

 


Arizona

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? No


Electronic and still photographic coverage of ”proceedings conducted by a judicial officer” is permitted, provided the media follow certain guidelines that set forth rules for coverage. Although judges have discretion to limit or prohibit such coverage, they may only do so where the likelihood of harm outweighs the public benefit. Media may also use personal audio recording devices, provided that the audio recording does not create a distraction in the courtroom. The photographing of jurors in a way that permits them to be recognized is strictly forbidden. Requests for coverage should be made to the judge of the particular proceeding at least two days in advance of the sought-after coverage event, unless said event is scheduled on less than three days notice. Only one television and one still camera is allowed in the courtroom at one time, and the media are responsible for arranging pooling agreements. No flash bulbs or additional artificial lights of any kind are allowed in the courtroom without the notification and approval of the presiding judge.


Oral arguments before the Arizona Supreme Court are available by webcast.

Authority: Rule 122, Rules of the Arizona Supreme Court, Ariz. Rev. Stat., Vol. 17A

Video Webcast: Arizona Supreme Court

 


Arkansas

Allows Cameras? No
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? Yes
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? No


A judge may authorize broadcasting, recording, or photographing in the courtroom and adjacent areas provided that “the participants will not be distracted, [n]or will the dignity of the proceedings be impaired.” An objection to the coverage by a party or attorney precludes media coverage of the proceedings and an objection by a witness precludes coverage of that witness. Coverage of juvenile matters in circuit court, all probate and domestic relations matters in circuit court, including adoption, guardianship, divorce, custody, support, and paternity, and all drug court proceedings is expressly prohibited. Similarly, coverage of jurors, minors without parental or guardian consent, sex crime victims, undercover police agents and informants is also prohibited.

Only one television and one still camera is allowed in the courtroom at one time and the media are responsible for arranging pooling agreements. If the court already has broadcasting equipment, it shall be used unless other arrangements are necessary.

Use of electronic devices without permission of the court is prohibited, including for e-mail, blogging, and tweeting .

Authority: Administrative Order Number 6, Rules of Civil Procedure - Appendix, Arkansas Code of 1987 Annotated (Court Rules)

Video Webcast: Supreme Court of Arkansas

 


California

 

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? Yes

 
Media coverage of state court proceedings is governed by Rule 1.150 of the California Rules of Court. Personal recording devices may be used with advance permission of the judge for personal note-taking only. Media coverage is permitted by written order of the judge following a media request for coverage filed at least five court days before the proceeding to be covered. Any such requests must be made on the official form provided by the courts.
Coverage of jury selection, jurors, spectators, proceedings held in chambers, proceedings closed to the public or conferences between an attorney and a client, witness or aide, between attorneys or between counsel and the judge is prohibited. Only one television and one still camera is allowed in the courtroom at one time and the media are responsible for arranging pooling agreements.
 
Los Angeles Superior Court Local Rule 2.17 prohibits any person inside a courtroom from photographing, recording, broadcasting, or activating any camera, microphone, recorder, or broadcasting device unless such activity is allowed by order or express permission.  Outside the courtroom, a person may engage in such activity if the person is in a designated media area or has written permission.  A person must obtain written permission from the court to carry in any camera, microphone, or recording equipment, or to activate the sound or image capturing features of any computer, mobile phone, or watch.  A person requesting media coverage of any type must file the appropriate forms.
 
In addition, Los Angeles Superior Court rules prohibit photography of any kind inside the courthouse or courtrooms  unless the photographer has permission and has filed the appropriate forms.  This ban on photography applies to all devices that can capture images, including cell phones.  Photographs taken         without permission will be deleted from the device and the photographer will be sanctioned.   
 
San Francisco Superior Court has a standing order that prohibits filming, photography, and electronic recording in the hallways and public areas of a certain floor of the courthouse.  In general, the standing order in San Francisco states that media coverage equipment, including cell phones, may only be used in designated media areas in the courthouse. 
 
Authority
 
Webcast and Other Links
 
Supreme Court of California (http://www.courtinfo.ca.gov/courts/supreme/audio-arch.htm)

California Courts:  Cameras in Court:      http://www.courts.ca.gov/10018.htm.

Los Angeles Superior Court Local Rules Summary:      http://www.lasuperiorcourt.org/courtnews/ui/main.aspx

Audio and Selected Video Webcast:  Supreme Court of California:  http://www.courts.ca.gov/2961.htm

 


Colorado

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? No

 
Under Colorado Supreme Court Rules, Chapter 38, Rule 2, the judge may authorize expanded media coverage—defined as any photography or audio recording of proceedings—subject to several guidelines. 
 
Judges have the power to prohibit expanded media coverage upon  a finding of substantial likelihood of interference with a fair trial, a reasonable likelihood that coverage will detract from the solemnity, decorum, or dignity of the court, or that coverage will create unique, adverse effects, or harm which is distinct from that caused by coverage by other types of media. Those wishing to cover a particular proceeding must submit a written request to do so to the presiding judge at least one day in advance of the proceeding and must give a copy of the request to the counsel for each party participating in the proceeding. Coverage of jury selection, in camera hearings and most pre-trial hearings is prohibited. No close-up photography of the jury, bench conferences or attorney-client communication is permitted. Consent of the participants is not required. The judge may also terminate coverage if the terms of the rules or additional rules imposed by the Court have been violated. Only one still and one video camera operator (with up to two cameras, at the judge’s discretion) are allowed in the courtroom at one time.  The camera operator may use a tripod but may not change positions while the court is in session. The media are responsible for arranging pooling agreements.
 

 


Connecticut
 

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? No
Media Guide Available?
Yes

Sections 70-9 and 70-10 of the Rules of Appellate Procedure (governing media coverage in the Appellate and  Supreme Courts) and Sections 1-10 and 1-11 of the Rules for the Superior Court (governing coverage in trial courts) permit the coverage of judicial proceedings under specific circumstances.
 
All proceedings of the Supreme and appellate courts are presumed to be open to coverage by camera or electronic media. The panel of jurists can only limit or preclude coverage if “there is good cause to do so, there are no reasonable alternatives to such limitations, and the limitation is no broader than necessary to    protect the competing interests at issue.” When the panel of jurists does limit or preclude coverage it must provide a statement of reasons. The presumption in favor of coverage does not apply to sexual offense cases or family relations matters.

At the trial court level, Connecticut adopted new rules that went into effect in January 2012.  Under the rules, a media organization, defined as “any person or entity that is regularly engaged in the gathering and dissemination of news,” must be approved by the Office of Chief Court Administrator.  Once approved, the media may broadcast, televise, record, or photograph court proceedings subject to several general limitations.  First, the media may not cover proceedings dealing with family relations matters, juvenile matters, sexual assault, or trade secrets.  Second, the media may not cover proceedings held without the jury present in a jury trial, unless the trial court makes an exception.  Third, the media may not cover proceedings that are closed to the public. 

Fourth, the media may not cover a trial during recess, or cover conferences amongst the parties.  Finally, the media may not cover jury selection.  

In addition, Connecticut has special rules for covering trial court arraignments, civil proceedings, and criminal proceedings.  For arraignments, the media must request permission for electronic coverage.  The court will give the state and the defendant the opportunity to object to the coverage request, and then the court will decide whether or not to grant the request.  If the request is granted, there are additional coverage limitations.  For example, the media may not cover conferences amongst the parties, the defendant while entering and exiting lockup, or documents in a close-up fashion.  In addition,  only one camera and one audio recording device may be used, the media may not use artificial lighting, the camera operator must remain in one location throughout the duration of the arraignment, and the court will decide the camera placement.

For civil proceedings at the trial court level, coverage is allowed unless the court finds substantial reason to believe that coverage will compromise a party’s legal rights, safety, or privacy.  The media may only use equipment that is not distracting, and no equipment may be moved and no film may be changed while the court is in session.  The court has discretion to require pooling arrangements. 

Finally, for criminal proceedings at the trial court level, any media representative who wants to cover criminal proceedings must  submit a written notice of coverage three days prior to the proceedings.  This requirement may be waived for good cause. The court may limit or preclude coverage if it finds substantial reason to believe that  coverage will compromise a party’s legal rights, safety, or privacy.  Under normal coverage circumstances, the media may only use one camera  and one audio recording device, and neither can be distracting.  Unless the judge makes an exception, the media may not use artificial lighting.  The judge decides the location of the camera and recording equipment, and the equipment may not be moved during the proceeding.  The court has discretion to require pooling arrangements.   

Connecticut also sets forth rules concerning the use and possession of electronic devices in state courtrooms.  Under Superior Court rules, individuals may bring cell phones and personal computers into courtrooms; however, individuals may not take pictures or broadcast sound or video with their cell phones and may only use personal computers for note taking.  Under Appellate and Supreme Court rules, individuals may have a cell phone, PDA, personal computer, or other electronic device that can broadcast, record, or take pictures; however, individuals may not use those devices to take pictures, record, or broadcast.  In addition, individuals may not use cell phones in the courtroom.     

Authority 

(1)    Rules of Appellate Procedure §§ 70-9, 70-10:  http://www.jud.ct.gov/publications/PracticeBook/PB_2012.pdf#page=465

(2)    Rules for the Superior Court §§ 1-10, 1-11:  http://www.jud.ct.gov/publications/PracticeBook/PB_2012.pdf#page=107

(3)    The Use and Possession of Electronic Devices in Superior Court Facilities:  http://www.jud.ct.gov/Publications/ES230.pdf

(4)    Supreme and Appellate Courts Guidelines for the Possession and Use of Electronic Devices: http://www.jud.ct.gov/external/supapp/electronicdevices_supapp.pdf
 
Other Links

Connecticut Courts: Cameras:    http://www.jud.ct.gov/external/media/faq.htm#Cameras

 


Delaware
 

Allows Cameras? No
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? Yes
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? No


Rule 53 of the Delaware Superior Court Criminal Rules, Rule 53 of the Delaware Family Court Criminal Rules, and Rule 53 of the Criminal Rules of Delaware Courts of Justices of the Peace forbid coverage. By order dated April 29, 1982, the Delaware Supreme Court issued guidelines for its one year appellate experiment. Under those guidelines, coverage is permissible so long as it does not impair or interrupt the orderly procedures of the Court. Consents of the parties are not required. This experiment was extended indefinitely by order of the Delaware Supreme Court, dated and effective May 2, 1983.

On April 5, 2004, the Delaware Supreme Court issued its Administrative Directive No. 155, which established a six-month trial court experiment, which was originally scheduled to end on October 15, 2004. In this experiment, media coverage was permitted in the Sussex Court of Chancery, and courtrooms in New Castle, Kent and Sussex Counties. Broadcast of non-confidential, non-jury, civil proceedings was permitted.

Administrative Directive No. 155 was amended on October 25, 2004, and the experiment was extended until May 16, 2005. On November 29, 2005, Administrative Directive No. 155 was again amended, this time extending the experimental period indefinitely.

Personal electronic devices, like cell phones, are prohibited in many Delaware courts.  For example, in Superior Court, all electronic devices are prohibited, including cell phones, PDAs, and Notebooks.  In Justice of the Peace locations, only authorized individuals may bring cell phones and other personal recording devices into the courtroom.  In the Kent County, New Castle County, and Sussex County courthouses, all personal communications devices, like cell phones with cameras, are generally prohibited from the courtroom, and only authorized individuals may bring these devices into the courtroom.  

Audio Webcast

Delaware Supreme Court:  http://courts.delaware.gov/Supreme/audioargs.stm

Authority

(1) Superior Court Electronic Device Prohibition:  http://courts.delaware.gov/superior/jury/jury_security.stm

(2) Justice of the Peace Court Cell Phones and Communications Devices Policy:  http://courts.delaware.gov/policy%20directives/download.aspx?ID=39688

(3) Kent County Courthouse Cellular Phone Policy:  http://courts.delaware.gov/Superior/pdf/cell_policy_KENT_rev.pdf

(4) New Castle County Cellular Phone Policy:  http://courts.delaware.gov/superior/pdf/cell_policy_NCC.pdf

(5) Sussex County Cellular Phone Policy:  http://courts.delaware.gov/superior/pdf/cell_policy_NCC.pdf
 

 


District of Columbia

Allows Cameras? No
Does Not Allow Cameras? Yes
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? Yes

 

DC courts do not allow members of the media or individuals to photograph or record courts proceedings. Superior Court Rule of Civil Procedure 203 (b) prohibits photographs, broadcasts, or tapes for public replay of any civil proceeding.  Superior Court Rule of Criminal Procedure 53(b) prohibits photographs, broadcasts, and mechanical recording devices; however, there are two exceptions.  First, the court may make an exception for the use of a mechanical recording device.  Second, the official in charge of a particular office or room in the courthouse may give permission to take photographs; the person being photographed must also consent.  Similarly, Family Court Rule 45 (e) prohibits photographing and broadcasting in courtrooms, and allows photographing in other rooms in the Family Court with the permission of the person in charge of the room and the person being photographed. 

Under Superior Court Administrative Order 11-17, people entering a Superior Court courtroom must turn off all electronic devices and store the devices in a location where they cannot be seen.  Even though the general rule applies to members of the media, the order specifies that the presiding judicial officer may give members of the media permission to use electronic devices for “official business.”  Even with special permission, the use of electronic devices is limited; members of the media may only use the device for court- or business-related matters, and members of the media may not use the device to photograph, record, or make transmissions of any type.  

Blogging may be allowed in DC Superior Court.  According to the Journalist’s Handbook to the Courts in the District of Columbia, a blogger must request permission to live-blog from a courtroom in advance of the proceeding, and the decision is entirely subject to the judge’s discretion.  

Authority

(1) Superior Court Rule of Civil Procedure 203 (b):  http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/documents/SUPERIOR_COURT_RULES_OF_CIVIL_PROCEDURE_090707.pdf 

(2) Superior Court Rule of Criminal Procedure 53 (b):  http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/documents/CriminalRules.pdf 

(3) Family Court Rule 45 (e):  http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/documents/order062104.pdf

(4) Superior Court Administrative Order 11-17:  http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/documents/11-17_Possession_and_Use_of_Electronic_Devices.pdf

Other Links

(1) Journalist’s Handbook to the Courts in the District of Columbia:  http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/documents/JournalistsHandbook.pdf

(2) Audio Webcast:  DC Court of Appeals:  http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/appellate/oralargs.jsf
 

 


Florida
 

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? Yes

 
Florida Rule of Judicial Administration 2.450 permits  electronic media and still photography coverage of proceedings in both the appellate and trial courts.  Under this rule, coverage is subject only to the authority of the presiding judge, who may prohibit coverage to control court proceedings, prevent distractions, maintain decorum, and assure fairness of the trial.   Exclusion of the media is permissible only where it is shown that the proceedings will be adversely affected because of a “qualitative difference” between electronic and other forms of coverage.  

Florida v. Palm Beach Newspapers, 395 So. 2d 544 (1981).  At least one television camera operated by one photographer and no more than two still cameras operated by one still photographer are allowed in trial and appellate courtrooms at one time.  The media are responsible for arranging pooling agreements.

 The coverage equipment may not be distracting and  members of the media have an affirmative duty to demonstrate to the judge, prior to proceedings, that the equipment is in compliance with the rule.   Members of the media may not use artificial lighting; however, the court may modify or add to the courtroom’s light sources as long as the changes do not involve a public expense. The court decides the placement of the cameras and members of the media may not move about the courtroom while proceedings are underway.  The media are prohibited from covering conferences amongst parties, like conferences between attorneys and their clients or attorneys and the judge.

Proposed Rule 2.451 would prohibit the use of electronic devices by jurors and other persons whose use is disruptive to the judicial proceeding.

 

Authority

(1) Florida Rule of Judicial Administration 2.450:  http://www.floridabar.org/TFB/TFBResources.nsf/Attachments/F854D695BA7136B085257316005E7DE7/$FILE/Judicial.pdf

(2) Proposed Rule 2.451:  http://www.floridabar.org/TFB/TFBResources.nsf/0/3316CFA89D374EF385257802006552D2/$FILE/Final%20Rule%202.451%20for%20E-vote%20with%20proof%20corrections.pdf?OpenElement

(3) Florida Rules of Judicial Administration Committee Report for Proposed Rule 2.451:  http://www.floridabar.org/cmdocs/cm235.nsf/c5aca7f8c251a58d85257236004a107f/1c50196b0ed255938525782d006f8ee0/$FILE/Out%20of%20cycle%20report%202.451%20ADA%204-12.pdf

(4) Florida v. Palm Beach Newspapers, 395 So. 2d 544 (1981):  http://www.leagle.com/xmlResult.aspx?xmldoc=1981939395So2d544_1843.xml&docbase=CSLWAR1-1950-1985

Other Links

(1) Florida Bar:  Cameras in the Courtroom:  http://www.floridabar.org/DIVCOM/PI/RHandbook01.nsf/1119bd38ae090a748525676f0053b606/5192d3660a0dd573852569cb004c8e15!OpenDocument

(2) Video Webcast:  Florida Supreme Court:  http://www.wfsu.org/gavel2gavel/index.php

 


Georgia
 

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? No
Media Guide Available? No

 

Probate Court Rule 10.10, Magistrate Court Rule 11, Juvenile Court Rules 26.1 and 26.2, and Municipal Court Rule 11 provide guidelines for extended media coverage in those judicial proceedings.  If the court elects to grant approval for expanded media coverage of a proceeding, it must be “without partiality or preference to any person, news agency, or type of electronic or photographic coverage.” Those requesting coverage in these proceedings must file a “timely written request” on a form provided by the court with the judge involved in the specific proceeding prior to the hearing or trial. The judge, at his or her discretion, may allow only one television or still photographer in the courtroom at any one time, thereby requiring a pooling arrangement. Any additional lights or flashbulbs must be approved by the judge beforehand. Lastly, under the Juvenile Court Rules, pictures of the child in juvenile proceedings are expressly prohibited.

Superior Court Rule 22, in additional to the above requirements, prohibits photographing or televising members of the jury, unless “the jury happens to be in the background of the topics being photographed.”

In the Court of Appeals, written requests for coverage must be submitted at least seven days in advance. Further, radio and television media are required to supply the Court with an audio or video tape, respectively, of all proceedings covered. Only one “pooled” television camera with one operator and one still photographer, with not more than two cameras, is allowed in the courtroom at any one time.

In the Supreme Court, coverage is allowed without prior approval from the Court and the Supreme Court retains exclusive authority to limit, restrict, prohibit and terminate coverage. No more than four still photographers and four television cameras will be permitted in the courtroom at any time. All television cameras are restricted to the alcove of the courtroom, while still photographers may sit anywhere in the courtroom designated for use by the public.
Probate Court Rule 10.3 specifically addresses the use of cell phones in probate courtrooms.  Cell phones shall no be heard in the courtroom, and the judge has the authority to further restrict the use of cell phones in the courtroom.    

Authority

 


Hawaii
 

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? Yes
Media Guide Available? No

 

Electronic media and still photography coverage of proceedings are allowed in both the appellate and trial courts. Consent of the judge prior to coverage of a trial proceeding is required, but prior consent of the judge is not required for coverage of appellate proceedings. The judge may rule on the request orally and on the record or by written order if requested by any party, but shall make written findings of fact and conclusions of law if coverage is denied.

A request for coverage will be granted unless good cause is found to prohibit it. Good cause for denying coverage is presumed to exist when the proceeding is for the purpose of determining the admissibility of evidence, when child witnesses or complaining witnesses in a criminal sexual offense case are testifying, when testimony regarding trade secrets is being given, when a witness would be put in substantial jeopardy of bodily harm, or when testimony of undercover law enforcement agents involved in other ongoing undercover investigations is being received.

Coverage of proceedings which are closed to the public is prohibited. These proceedings include juvenile cases, child abuse and neglect cases, paternity and adoption cases, and grand jury proceedings. Coverage of jurors or prospective jurors is prohibited. Only one television camera and one still photographer, with not more than two still cameras are allowed in the courtroom at one time (although the judge may allow more at his/her discretion) and the media are responsible for arranging pooling agreements.

Any individual may request to record judicial proceedings.  The recording device must be small and hand-held, have a built-in microphone, and be operated from the seat of the person recording.   The request to the judge must be timely, and the judge decides whether or not to grant the request.  Otherwise, the public is asked to turn off cell phones and electronic devices when they enter the courtroom. 

Jurors are specifically instructed not to discuss the case being tried via “emailing, text messaging, tweeting, blogging or any other form of communication.”  

Authority
(1) Rules 5.1 and 5.2, Rules of the Supreme Court of the State of Hawaii:  http://www.courts.state.hi.us/docs/court_rules/rules/rsch.htm#Rule_5.1
 
(2) Jury Instructions Regarding Social Media:  http://www.courts.state.hi.us/docs/legal_references/jury_instruct6.pdf
 
Other Links
 
(1) Hawaii State Judiciary, Tips of Going to Court:  http://www.courts.state.hi.us/self-help/tips/tips_on_going_to_court.html
 
 

 


Idaho
 

Allows Cameras? Yes
Does Not Allow Cameras? No
Partial Allowance of Cameras? No
Audio or Video Webcast? No
Media Guide Available? Yes
 
Rule 45 of the Idaho Court Administrative Rules (ICAR) allows extended coverage of all public proceedings, provided permission to cover a proceeding is obtained in advance from the presiding judge.  ICAR Rule 46 provides guidelines for the use of cameras in appellate proceedings.
 
In trial courts, the presiding judge may prohibit coverage or order that the identity of a participant be concealed when such coverage would have a substantial adverse effect upon that participant. Coverage of the jury, adoptions, mental health proceedings and other proceedings closed to the public is prohibited. Permission to photograph or broadcast a proceeding must be sought, in advance, from the presiding judge. Electronic flash or artificial lighting is prohibited, and the television camera may not “give any indication of whether it is operating.”  

Only one still photographer and one camera operator is permitted in the courtroom, and any pooling arrangements must be made by the media.  If the judge decides to limit or prohibit coverage, the decision cannot be appealed.  
 
In the Supreme Court, ICAR Rule 46(a) allows cameras to be set up or taken down in the press box as long as the activity does not distract from judicial proceedings.  Flash photography and the use of additional lighting for video photography are prohibited. The court will provide an audio feed for television cameras and audio recorders, but no separate microphones may be used.
 
Cell phones and other electronic devices should be turned off or set to vibrate mode.  Individuals may be able to use laptop computers in a courtroom, but the rule varies from courtroom to courtroom.  

Authority

Idaho Court Administrative Rule 45:  http://www.isc.idaho.gov/rules/icar45.txt
 
Idaho Court Administrative Rule 46:  http://www.isc.idaho.gov/rules/icar46.txt
 
Idaho Court Administrative Rule 46(a):  http://www.isc.idaho.gov/rules/icar46a.txt
 
Idaho Court Administrative Rule 46(b):  http://www.isc.idaho.gov/rules/icar46b.txt

Other Links

The Media Guide to the Idaho Courts:  http://www.isc.idaho.gov/files/ISC-Media-Guide-Print.pdf