Money Matters: Things never to do with your credit card number

February 7, 2020 01:00

Sponsored by NEFE

Take a look in your wallet for a moment. Got any cash? Likely not! Credit cards are so much more convenient these days, and technology is always making it more convenient to shop. But is it secure? Help your audience protect their identities and money by sharing some credit card safety tips.



Send it by email (or text or social media message)
Emails and social media messages are vulnerable to hacking and misuse. You wouldn’t put your credit card number, security code and address on a flyer and post it around town like a missing poster. Avoid writing down or typing out your credit card information via messaging. If you’re typing your credit card information, it should be directly into a secure online merchant form.

Enter it online when using public Wi-Fi
Public Wi-Fi networks are easy for hackers to access, too. If you need to check your credit card account or do online shopping, use a private, password protected network or a VPN service.

Save it in an online merchant site
It may be convenient to agree to let an online retailer save your credit card information, but online merchants can be breached, too. Consider using an online or mobile payment system like PayPal instead, which adds a layer of protection between your credit card information and online retailers.

Read it aloud in a public place or say it over the phone to someone who has called you.
Keep your credit card information private and be wary of incoming calls or messages asking for personal information. If you do need to give your credit card information over the phone, it’s most secure if you initiate the call and verify the authenticity of the transaction first.

Use the same password for your credit card account as any other online account password
Instead, select a unique password. Change it often. If multifactor authentication is available – that’s when you’re asked to verify your identity by a second method when signing in from an unfamiliar device – use it.
What other credit card safety and security tips can you share with your audience?


Weekly Money Matters personal finance content for your newsroom is sponsored by the National Endowment for Financial Education



 


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